Imperial Valley College Faculty Websites

You are here:Instructors»David Sheppard»CDEV 106»anecdotal/ self help skills
Wednesday, 21 September 2011 21:02

anecdotal/ self help skills

Written by David Sheppard
Rate this item
(2 votes)

 

          ANECDOTAL RECORDING

          Detailed, factual account of what the recorder sees and hears, best if it’s written immediately after the incident

          Narrative, when, where, who, and what happened and the result

          Like a very short story

          Includes direct quotes

          Inferences or conclusions are kept separate

          Anecdotal Record

          Uses of the Anecdotal Record

Advantages

          Preserves all the important details

          Others can read it to make their own interpretations

          Needs no special forms

          Gives reader a sense of being there

          Useful for all areas of development

          Child abuse reporting

Disadvantages

          Difficult to write without inferences slipping in

          Takes time and attention away from children to write

          Selection of incident that may be a positive or negative impression

          Limited to one or two children at a time

          What to Do with It

          File in child’s portfolio/folder

          Use to individualize the curriculum for
that child

          Share with other teachers and family
for insight

          Confer with helping professionals

          Talk with child

          Evidence to Child Protective Services

          TOPICS IN OBSERVATION
Using All Our Senses

What can you tell about a child from each of your senses?

Seeing – Appearance, activities, safety

Hearing – Language, emotions, health

Touching – Muscle tone, illness, stress

Smelling – Hygiene, illness, home odors

Tasting – Probably not

The “Sixth Sense” – Emotional radar

          LOOKING AT SELF-CARE SKILLS

          Dependent on:

        Physical, emotional, cognitive, social development

          Influenced by:

        Heredity, family, peers, experiences, culture

          Autonomy

        Growing independence

          Self-Care Skills

          Eating

          Toileting

          Dressing

          Personal Hygiene

          Sleeping

          In the classroom

          HELPING ALL CHILDREN WITH
SELF-CARE SKILLS

Children with Special Needs

          Standard Related to Self-Help Skills

NAEYC Early Childhood Program Standards and Accreditation Criteria

4.B.02  Assessments   Obtain information on all areas of children’s development and learning, including cognitive skills, language, social-emotional development, approaches to learning, health, and physical development (including self-help skills).